PREsale commercial license questions


#1

Hi there,
I"m relatively new to juce c++ (but played a lot these days)
Very comfortable with max5.

I’m looking for the right framework to design VSTi & fx.

I’d need to create VST for win & osx

Juce C++ is amazing & powerful. Now I’m sure about that
BUT the big problem is: I have to reinvent the wheel at each corner of my journey inside VST design

I can deal with that but it is very time killing :-/
I’m looking for advices, ways and path to follow to be okay with that.

I understand right well the big documentation about classes etc.
But imagine that:
I want to create a special sequencer producing midi notes (& cc too) … I’d need to code everything from scratch
I’m sure it is THE powerful way, but it can cost a lot of time.

For instance, with max5, I can do that VERY quickly, and optimise it step by step, and even code C++ objects later with their sdk for the time critics steps.

I open this thread because I’m almost convince Juce (and Jules!) is the way to follow because it provides a robust framework, vst wrapper etc. But I’m a bit confuse because I can loose 3h to prepare my architecture with juce, and I’d need to spend those 3h (at least 2h30) to work on my sequencer core you know

any discussions, helps would be appreciate :slight_smile:


#2

Hi gluontronic,
I’m a max user too. I’ve been using it for years before entering the world of c++, and I’m still using it (mainly in school).
I can tell you about my experience.
Max is very powerful in its workflow, and I’m used to it, so during the last years I’ve been coding some c++ classes (gui, audio…) in a similar way max’s object are built, using a sort of standard that lets me connect them very easily and without too many parameters to handle.
And now I have a lot of “bricks” that I can reuse whenever I need them.
Believe it or not, I don’t have a juce license yet. I decided to create my main application first, without releasing it to the public.
Once I’ll be satisfied with the development I’ll buy it and I’ll release the app.


#3

[quote=“masshacker”]Hi gluontronic,
I’m a max user too. I’ve been using it for years before entering the world of c++, and I’m still using it (mainly in school).
I can tell you about my experience.
Max is very powerful in its workflow, and I’m used to it, so during the last years I’ve been coding some c++ classes (gui, audio…) in a similar way max’s object are built, using a sort of standard that lets me connect them very easily and without too many parameters to handle.
And now I have a lot of “bricks” that I can reuse whenever I need them.
Believe it or not, I don’t have a juce license yet. I decided to create my main application first, without releasing it to the public.
Once I’ll be satisfied with the development I’ll buy it and I’ll release the app.[/quote]

thanks a lot for your feedback, masshacker.
I understand the reusability of c++ code.
It is a nice way.

I can code by myself, but my real added value is around designing instruments, fx on a little higher level than (the already high) C++ one.
I mean, if we could put the C++ at 1 and max (graphical env) at 10, I’d need more a 4 or 5 stuff.

For instance, I want to build a sequencer I named “spiraloid sequencer”.
With max, I can prototype it very easily, work on the I/O parts, make abstractions etc. … But I cannot produce a VST.
With juce, I have to code a lot of structure (and some would be so specific that I won’t reuse them anymore…), But in the end, I’d have VST for windows & osx, AU, RTAS etc etc

Two ways, very opposite.

SynthEdit or SynthMaker could fit too but only produces VST for Windows!
They also offers a SDK each one. If I decide to “begin” by VST for Windows only, I’d choose SynthMaker I guess.

It would be nice to chat a bit with you
I’m julien.bayle@gmail.com on gtalk and msn.

best,