Padding cropped audio


#1

Hi

Does anybody know what’s the best way to add a few seconds of silence at the end of a cropped audio loop without getting the click noise?

I’m also looking for a good audio book /DSP, so far these are my candidates, if you can suggest / recommend one I’ll be very thankful.

The Computer Music Tutorial
Real Sound Synthesis for Interactive Applications
Principles of Digital Audio, Sixth Edition
Digital Audio Explained: For The Audio Engineer
Real World Digital Audio
Digital Audio Essentials


#2

How about keeping it simple and just doing a quick fade at the end of the loop before adding the silence? Ramp down from 0 to say -100dB over the last t msec. Try t = 50 at first as this corresponds to a full cycle at 20Hz. If you’re still getting clicks you can either increase the fade time or high pass filter the loop first.


#3

Thanks Andrew, that did the job.


#4

Sweet! :smiley:


#5

Just noticed AudioSampleBuffer::applyGainRamp()

Nice


#6

In terms of books, you may find this one useful:

There is also Moore’s book ‘the elements of computer music’. Both of these books present examples using low level code.


#7

Thanks Rory!

The Audio Programming Book looks impressive (with over 800 pages!) so it just might be the one.
Moor’s book is kinda old though (1990)

Isn’t any “bible” book in this domain like “The C++ Programming Language” & K&R © ?


#8

You might also consider
Designing Audio Effect Plug-Ins in C++: With Digital Audio Signal Processing Theory
http://www.amazon.com/Designing-Audio-Effect-Plug-Ins-Processing/dp/0240825152/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355216587&sr=1-1

It’s so fresh that it’s first published in 2013!


#9

There’s also 35 DVD chapters with plenty of code examples. It’s massive.


#10

[quote=“Shlomi”]Thanks Rory!

The Audio Programming Book looks impressive (with over 800 pages!) so it just might be the one.
Moor’s book is kinda old though (1990)

Isn’t any “bible” book in this domain like “The C++ Programming Language” & K&R © ?[/quote]

Yeah I have The Audio Programming Book, It really is a fantastic resource.


#11

[quote=“oxxyyd”]You might also consider
Designing Audio Effect Plug-Ins in C++: With Digital Audio Signal Processing Theory
http://www.amazon.com/Designing-Audio-Effect-Plug-Ins-Processing/dp/0240825152/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355216587&sr=1-1
[/quote]

Thanks oxxyyd, the table of contents looks very good, I also searched the book for ‘Juce’ (with Amazon) and didn’t find it, how can a book about plug-ins not mentioning JUCE? If I was to build a plug-in from scratch, I would have wanted to know about this thing called JUCE that will probably save me half of the work!


#12

That does seem a bit bizarre… Maybe the author’s got connections with Steinberg or something, so couldn’t mention rivals.


#13

Isn’t the author pushing his own RAD programming tool?

Rail


#14

I can attest to both of those books. Audio Programming (Boulanger) has been a great reference, and I recently got sent a copy of Designing Audio Effect Plug-Ins in C++ (Pirkle). It actually covers quite a bit, and the DSP explanations are fairly straightforward I thought (at least the parts I’ve looked at). Rail is right though, its all using the authors platform called RackAFX, which doesn’t get me all too excited (although it is designed to make making generic GUIs easy, with different goals than JUCE). I can see how it would be useful in a classroom setting (which his intro described as his motivation), where the time spent setting up plugin params, and the GUI (and 2-way communication and automation) can eat away useful time from DSP, algorithm, and programming design.

His tool does VST/AU wrapping of his “RackAFX”. In any case, the beginning chapters were easy to read and pretty good, so although its a bit odd he doesn’t mention Juce, which would be great in a chapter to discuss working outside of RackAFX, I think many could still get useful information from the book.


#15

Yes, it’s certainly a good book for learning how to make plugins. You can read more about RackAFX and his book here http://www.willpirkle.com/, and look
and the book projects http://www.willpirkle.com/project-gallery/ where you also can download the code and look at a demonstration video.


#16

That does seem a bit bizarre… Maybe the author’s got connections with Steinberg or something, so couldn’t mention rivals.[/quote]

I actually took Will Prickle’s plugin programming class this semester at the U of Miami (great teacher, btw!). I asked about JUCE the other day and he said he literarily didn’t know about it until right after his book was published. RackAFX does the wrapper for VST (only Windows 32bit atm) but not AU, which is how I ran into JUCE (and what a godsend!!!) Yeah, RackAFX was made mostly with the intention of teaching students the DSP algorithms and “guts” of the processing without them having to worry about the GUI stuff. Apparently before RackAFX his students would spend the majority of their time fine tuning flashy GUIs and never really learn the DSP :smiley:

The book is a fantastic DSP resource and reflects the author’s chill/pragmatic character. It never gets too academic.


#17

The fact that it doesn’t get too academic was one of the disappointing things for me about this book. I felt it it just a little light weight. The two books are completely different beats. The Audio programming book leans towards text books like Moore’s Elements of Computer Music, while Designing Audio Effect Plug-Ins in C++ is more akin to the Computer Music Tutorial. Both great text books, just depends on your needs.


#18

Just an update for anybody who’s interested, RackAFX 6 is out now for free & now supports an AU/VST export function: http://www.willpirkle.com/

I’ve been using JUCE modules in my latest RackAFX projects. Great way to make the transition to fully customizable GUI stuffs.