Which debugger frontend


#1

i’m actually using insight which is a front-end debugger for gdb in tcl/tk (!?!crap). i find it not very usable and it stinks every time. it’s not an easy task do debugging on the linux side. which debugger frontend you use ?


#2

I use the Anjuta IDE myself (v1 - I couldn’t for the life of me work out the dependencies to get v2 to build), which has a gdb front end integrated. It’s not the best when it comes to debugging, but it’s usually good enough for me, and most distros tend to have v1 in their repositories.

If you want to check it out, see Phil or MouseToOSC for example anjuta project files - I’ve set them up so that you can set the JUCE path when you run the configure script.

  • Niall.

#3

hey gr8 :wink:
i must download your projects file and see what happens. lately i’ve tried “ddd” which is another big bloated debugger (looking at the dependancies it seems a very big one) but after 2 minutes of trying it i came up removing it immediately… it always opens up wrong files and even changing the default font i can’t even read what is written in there. blah… why people write software using ada or tcl/tk ? i can’t stand those crazy developers…
anyway thanx for the tip, i’ll stick a bit with anjuta (i’ve used for small projects and seems good) even if i have to manually create the project tree for a llllot of files. mmmh importing project from makefiles, that is an interesting feature to do for it…
:smiley:


#4

Yeah, the fact that you can’t get Anjuta to add whole folders of source code to a project can be a real pain (especially whenever I update Twindy - I have to go through all the folders in the JUCE tree and add them one-by-one :?). A tip though: don’t add .h files to your project in Anjuta - it expects them to be in a separate include directory (and will copy them across if they’re not), and when you run make install, it will copy them over to /usr/local/include, something which would only be necessary if you’re writing a library. I tend to use the Files workspace view rather than the Project view, as that way I can still see the .h files, and it has a collapsable tree structure (you can also customise it to ignore Makefiles etc.).

Oh, and another thing - for some reason autoconf always appends “-O2 -g” to my CXXFLAGS and CFLAGS variables, meaning it’s not actually possible to debug the program properly (the optimisation screws things up), or play with the optimisation settings. To get around this, you have to run the configure script as:

To do this in Anjuta, use the ‘Configure…’ dialog from the build menu and add the CXXFLAGS and CFLAGS bits to the text box. You have to do this every time you run the Auto generate command.

  • Niall.

#5

I may really dislike windows, but I only program for windows (well, the occasional bsd program) because it has the best dev tools. If *nix has been around so long and is so popular with enthusiest C/C++ programmers, why is it so lacking in dev tools of anything near Visual Studio quality? I’ve still yet to see a debugger near as good as VS’s.

[size=59]Gull, I hate praising something of Microsoft’s…[/size]


#6

yeah this is really a big pain when u got huge projects to handle :frowning:
i’ve looked at v2 and there isn’t any make file project import, instead they throwed in the new syntaxsourcetexteditorcomponentgodmode… ouch!
anyway thanx for the flags tips…

i think so too. *nix is here for a long time since my school time. i lacked a good development environment those days. then passed something like 10 years and still i lack devtools. i start thinking that i can wait other 10 years and not see any changes on that platform. i also think some projects have to be removed forever due to their’ oldness and crapness (tcl/tk in 2006? bleargh :shock:)…


#7

Have you tried KDevelop. I haven’t used Linux for a while and I used DDD at that time (and only the gdb console as school made me a gdb freak), but I’ve been told that KDevelop was the closest thing to Visual Studio on Linux …


#8

Hi,

Have a look at Code::Blocks IDE. http://www.codeblocks.org
It is cross-platform / multi-compiler, uses GDB…etc.


Regards,
Hakki Dogusan


#9

I have KDevelop on my BSD box, came pre-installed, have not run it yet. Thanks for recommending it, will give it a try. :slight_smile:

I have tried CodeBlocks, it has issues…

I want an IDE like VS, intellisense, debugging, embedded source control (I like the SVN integration, works perfect), etc…


#10