Juce 1.8


#1

Hi folks

I’ve just (finally) uploaded version 1.8, so please check it out and let me know if I’ve messed anything up!

There’s a changelist on the news page:

http://www.rawmaterialsoftware.com/news.php

And you’ll probably notice I’ve also been having a spring-clean of the website, so if you spot any broken links, shout!


#2

Geez, it’s about time you did something, ya lazy bum!! :wink: :lol:

OMG and WTF??! Does it run on Linux now??


#3

broken link?

Please feel free to browse the API documentation here.

http://www.rawmaterialsoftware.com/juce/docs/


#4

[quote=“bithead”]broken link?

Please feel free to browse the API documentation here.

http://www.rawmaterialsoftware.com/juce/docs/[/quote]

ah, well spotted. Ta.


#5

Doesn’t look like it yet :(, there’s only win32 and OSX files in the zip. I’d like to know how JUCE will work with linux myself - is it going to be based on a previous toolkit like qt or gtk (like wxwidgets is), or (fingers crossed :wink:) will it communicate directly with the x server?

I had a crazy idea of creating a linux window manager/DE based on Tracktion’s screen layout - you could have a file manager window as the smaller lower panel, then whenever you open an application, it’s window fills the main (tracks in Tracktion) panel. You’d then page between application windows with tabs or something - it would be kind of like ion, but it would look much cooler, and be more intuitive, imo. It would probably be a huge amount of work, but I’d love to give it a shot when JUCE is running on linux…

  • Niall.

#6

Yeah, I posted that prematurely…looked over the source and realized it’s not there… :?


#7

About linux: I actually bought myself a machine to run linux on a couple of weeks ago. Then I spent several days trying to install fedora, mandrake 9, mandrake 10, gentoo, debian (woody), debian (sarge), knoppix, freebsd, windows 98, and finally XP. All of them failed in different ways, but none got further than formatting the hard disk.

So that was a waste of time + money.

But I’ve got a plan B: I’ve ordered a new hard-disk for my laptop, and I’ll install it on that. When I finally get something that runs linux, it shouldn’t be too hard to get it all working - I’ve got a basic set of code that works with cygwin - it just needs tidying up + testing.


#8

Yeah a new release ! I will check it soon :wink:


#9

[quote=“jules”]About linux: I actually bought myself a machine to run linux on a couple of weeks ago. Then I spent several days trying to install fedora, mandrake 9, mandrake 10, gentoo, debian (woody), debian (sarge), knoppix, freebsd, windows 98, and finally XP. All of them failed in different ways, but none got further than formatting the hard disk.

So that was a waste of time + money.

But I’ve got a plan B: I’ve ordered a new hard-disk for my laptop, and I’ll install it on that. When I finally get something that runs linux, it shouldn’t be too hard to get it all working - I’ve got a basic set of code that works with cygwin - it just needs tidying up + testing.[/quote]

I just installed RedHat at work today and it wasn’t too hard, anyway I found out about this http://www.knoppix.net/ its a Debian based and can boot from a CD! I will try it, maybe take a look…


#10

I’m running Agnula’s DeMuDi distro myself (link - seems to be down at the moment? :?), connected to the Debian unstable repositories (DeMuDi’s based on Debian). It’s the huge repositories that I love about Debian - as long as you’re willing to risk the unstable ones (and they’re really not that unstable - I’ve never noticed any problems) there’s a huge amount of software available, and you don’t have to worry about tracking down dependencies, as it’s all handled automatically.

The thing about Linux (for audio anyway) is that the only way to get decent low-latency audio is to apply a patch to the kernel (i.e. re-compile it), which sounds kind of a scary thing to do (to me, anyway). That’s why I went for an audio/music-specific distro, as the patch is applied for you, and it comes with a bunch of audio-specific software. Of course, it turns out it doesn’t actually make much difference to me, as neither of my main two soundcards (Audiophile USB, Indigo IO) have drivers for Linux…

As far as LiveCDs go, I thought dyne:bolic was kind of cool myself - it’s essentially a LiveCD distro designed for multimedia work, so it has the low latency patch applied, along with a pile of audio- and video-related software.

  • Niall.

#11