Ideal hardware/software configuration for JUCE?


#1

I’d like to start fresh on a synth project using JUCE, presumably under Linux. Would like to bypass as many compatibility/configuration issues so I can just start coding and hearing great stuff as soon as possible. Linux is not a requirement, but this will be an open source project so it’s preferred.

Can someone tell me the best setup to start with, preferably laptop-based? Not too budget constrained. Mostly looking for whatever system has the least compatibility & installation problems. Windows & OS/X are acceptable; all things being equal I prefer the “freeness” of Linux so that others can benefit as inexpensively as possible.


#2

Considering that JUCE can target all the popular platforms, you should go with whatever operating system / development IDE you are most comfortable and productive with.

For me, that’s Visual Studio 2010 by a clear margin.


#3

Thanks, Vinnie. I confess I do like Visual Studio (worked on that team at MSFT back in the day).


#4

The debugger really cannot be beat.


#5

Yep, sold! I’ve started work on it using VS2010. Nice to be back.


#6

Yeah, I agree that VS is still the best IDE, if you can tolerate using Windows.

Personally I use OSX because it’s a proper unix machine, and the whole desktop experience is just so beautifully designed… But Xcode does irritate me.


#7

As a nice add-on to vs2010, I can recommend the excellent and affordable visual assist plugin: http://www.wholetomato.com/downloads/
It quite a few refactoring features that saves a lot of typing (or error-prone search&replace) actions and simplifies navigating through a large code base a lot!


#8

[quote=“jules”]Yeah, I agree that VS is still the best IDE, if you can tolerate using Windows.

Personally I use OSX because it’s a proper unix machine, and the whole desktop experience is just so beautifully designed… But Xcode does irritate me.[/quote]

+1 :smiley:

I’m using VS, XCode, Eclipse and other embedded specific tools (such as MPLAB :? ), VS is definitely the best dev tool I ever used.

Actually, Microsoft is able to conceive very good dev tools but the general ergonomics is not their strong point. Apple provides intuitive and efficient usage, but XCode is a nightmare (their keyboards too, I’m often searching the right key combination to get a simple , or [], or {}…). Linux is a great versatile platform… accessible to specialized engineers…

This is a caricature, but not that much finally :smiley:

+1 too :idea: I’m using it for 4 years, I can not do without.


#9

I mostly agree what guys say about VC++.

Just a random thought — you should decide which platform your users use the most and use it for development. This will ensure your program is well tested against it. Sure, you will be able to test it against all platforms but no one will be tested as good as the platform you’re currently working on.

In other words, you should sacrifice ease of use for yourself but gain more stable app for your customers.


#10

Excellent advice!